questions about - Sensors

Where should I place my garage door safety eyes sensors ?

Safety eye sensors and auto reverse features became mandatory on all automatic garage door openers beginning on January 1, 1993. The new mandate was to prevent entrapment and serious injury or death caused if a garage door closed on a person. Prior to January 1, 1993 garage door opener manufacturers did not have safety features to prevent entrapment injuries and deaths.   The first part of the law established the requirement of having an automatic reverse feature that would cause the garage door to automatically stop and then reverse to the fully open position, if the garage door closed on
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How High Should Garage Door Safety Eyes Be Mounted?

Garage door safety eyes are designed and installed to protect people from becoming entrapped under a closing garage door. The standards are set by Federal and State Legislation. Information can be found in Current standards require that safety eye sensors be mounted not more than 6” inches above the floor or ground. If the sensors are installed above 6” inches above the floor, they may not detect an individual lying down on the garage floor under the closing door. The sensors should detect anything under the closing door and the door should reverse and return to the fully open position.
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The light on one of the safety eye sensors on my garage door opener is not solid, what should I do?
LiftMaster-Sensors-solid-green-light

The safety eye sensors became mandatory on all garage door openers manufactured on or after January 1, 1993. The safety eyes sensors became mandatory to protect children from entrapment and death from garage doors closing on them. The safety eye sensors are mounted to or by the vertical track of the garage door about 6″-8″inches above the floor. One of the safety eye sensors is a transmitter, that transmits a beam, and the other is a receiver, that receives the beam. If the beam is broken by any object, while the door is closing, the door will stop and reverse
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Is it possible to only replace one of the safety sensors on my garage door opener and not both of them?

Is it possible to only replace one of the safety sensors on my garage door opener and not both of them? Safety eye sensors are mandatory on all garage door openers manufacture on or after January 1, 1993, and will not function with the sensors failing or disconnected. This is to protect children from entrapment and even death from a garage door closing on them. The safety eye  sensors function to create a beam with one sensor, amber colored light being the transmitter, and the other sensor, green light being the receiver. If either sensor fails the garage door opener
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Why won’t my garage door close in the morning, but will close at night?

Why won’t my garage door close in the morning, but will close at night? Garage doors operate as a system and several things could cause your door to not close in the morning, but will close at night. If the door starts down and reverses accompanied by the opener lights flashing and a clicking sound, this indicates a safety eye sensor issue. It could also be caused if the door is meeting some type of resistance. If the motor senses resistance it will stop and reverse to protect the unit from overheating and damage. The first thing you should do
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What should I do if the wire from the opener to the sensor broke ?
Garage-door-sensor

Safety eye sensors have been required on all garage door openers manufactured on or after January 1, 1993. The safety eye sensors shoot a beam across the width of the garage door opening, if the beam is broken the door will not close. The opener also will not open with the safety eyes removed. This safety eye sensor system is designed to prevent children from getting entrapped under the door causing serious injury or death. If you have broken wire from the opener to the safety eye sensor, it is a pretty simple thing to fix if you have basic
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